The Best Moments

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I treasure those moments that I can focus on deeply immersive activities such as writing, playing music, puzzling out design problems, developing creative strategies to make various things work, and especially working with individuals and groups to help them discover their own creative lives. Lately I have found those times hard to realize and I feel the absence keenly.

What do you want the days of your life to look like? Where do you want to spend them? Who do you want around you? These are some of the questions I offer up to challenge colleagues and students.

What is your purpose? Can you move forward with intent?

I appreciate the depth and breadth of work of Mikhaly Csikszentmihalyi in his research and writing on flow, especially in the context of leadership and happiness. His works provide a way to consider how a person might wish to live a life of creativity and intent.

“The best moments in our lives are not the passive, receptive, relaxing times… The best moments usually occur if a person’s body or mind is stretched to its limits in a voluntary effort to accomplish something difficult and worthwhile.” ~ Mihaly Csikszentmihaly

“Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi is one of the pioneers of the scientific study of happiness. He was born in Hungary in 1934 and, like many of his contemporaries, he was touched by the Second World War in ways that deeply affected his life and later work. During his childhood, he was put in an Italian prison. It was here, amid the misery and loss of family and friends during the war, that he had his first inkling of his seminal work in the area of flow and optimal experience.”

(Sobel, D. (1995, January). Interview: Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. Omni, 73-90.)

Good Business: Leadership, Flow, and the Making of Meaning
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
Penguin Books
Copyright Mihaly Csikszentmihaly, 2003
ISBN: 9781101127001

Featured image by: David Marcu http://www.dmarcu.com/.

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